Collage

Collages: Splashes Of Colour

I’m sharing three collages today as part of an ongoing collage project following the prompts in The Collage Workbook by Randel Plowman. Here is my collage for prompt no. 18 – tissue paper…

Indian Summer - NB
Indian Summer

This is a brightly coloured collage aptly named “Indian Summer”. Numerous scraps of tissue paper have been worked into this collage, of different colours, along with some dried flowers and a scrap of crocheted cotton…

Avocado Dreams - NB
Avocado Dreams

Above we have promt no 19 – cardboard. I used a strip of cardboard from a box that something was delivered in. I painted it with Titanium White acrylic paint, left it to dry and then went over it with some acrylic craft paint called “Avocado”. I stuck it down the left side of my collage and it complements the other collage elements nicely…

Escape - NB
Escape

Here we have prompt no. 20 – maps. I tore up sections of three different maps and used them for the base of my collage. Then I used tea bag papers and fabrics scraps to collage over the top of the maps.

All three collages measure 20 cm x 20 cm. I have now also glued all my collages into a new A4 sketchbook and I have to say it’s nice to flip through the pages and see all the different collages I’ve created so far. Collages are a fun, no pressure way to create art…

Watercolour

Rocks

Here are some watercolour sketches I did over the past week. I was practicing painting rocks, as in the sort you find on the beach…

Rocks 1 - NB

The purpose of the exercise was to try and capture 3 dimensional shape and depth by changing the tone gradually from light to dark…

Rocks On A Beach - NB

I’ve chosen mostly rounded shapes for these rock sketches but I will try some more with more angular shapes. I’ve tried to capture a little texture in the rocks too by varying the tones of the paint. You can click on the images to view them larger if you wish.

These were fairly simple sketches to do; they didn’t take long; and they were fun… !

Collage

The Return Of The Collage Project

Today, after a 3 month break,  I am resuming the collage project I was doing with my sister Carolyn. The project had been temporarily shelved for an assortment of reasons but I can now see my way clear to resume where I left off. Carolyn probably wont be posting any for a while yet but do click the link and enjoy browsing through her art work anyway.

For our collage project we were following the prompts in The Collage Workbook by Randel Plowman. It’s a great book with wonderful creative collage ideas. Today I begin with prompt no. 16 which is “upside down”. Here’s what I did…

Drifting Into Autumn - NB
Drifting Into Autumn

I have chosen soft autumn colours for this collage and I have deliberately placed several elements of the collage upside down. In my corner of the UK autumn is setting in early – trees are changing colour in the park and leaves are dropping like mad. It’s more than likely due to our unusually hot summer and lack of rain.

I have also done prompt no. 17 which is “finger paint”. I had to place some paint onto my collage using only my fingers – a little bit messy but quite fun to do…

Summer Breeze - NB
Summer Breeze

Soft blue shades dominate this collage. White and turquoise acrylic paint was fingered down the left hand side of the collage but I have covered over some of it with collage elements. There is also some white paint across the top too. Erosion Bundle paper was used for this collage along with some used teabags, some scrim and a couple of bits of flaky paint I found in the harbour which probably came off a boat or two…

I love collage – it’s so much fun. I love how it’s a form of art that anyone can do, whether you have no art experience at all or are a seasoned professional artist. Collage can be as simple or as complex as you wish. It’s a fun way to let your imagination run wild.

More collages are in progress as I speak and I will post them soon. Why not try a little collage work this week… ?

Drawing & Sketching

Doors and Windows

I’ve spent a little time sketching some doors and windows today. Any time spent drawing/sketching is time well spent, whatever the outcome. Architecture interests me – I like doors, windows, old buildings, Mediterranean style buildings and unusual shaped architectural features. Here’s today’s sketching efforts…

Mediterranean Door Sketch - NB
A Mediterranean Door

My first sketching effort, above, is a Mediterranean door. I liked the little narrow window and the old  cracked stonework underneath. The heavy wooden door was set into the wall with a couple of very worn steps leading up to it. It’s a building that has character. I deliberately didn’t sketch every last detail – I just concentrated on drawing just enough to tell the story…

Mediterranean Window Sketch - NB
A Mediterranean Window

The Mediterranean window above caught my eye. I liked how the shutters were just slightly open and I liked the nearby lamp on the wall. Drawing the angle of the shutters correctly was a bit tricky. I have to keep telling myself “just draw what you see” and not what you think you see…

Quirky Cornish Door - NB
A Quirky Cornish Door

I liked the unusual shape of this Cornish door – the sloping angle of the lintel and door. It  was very quirky and had lots of character…

I like drawing. As I’ve already said, drawing every last detail isn’t important to me – I just want to concentrate on drawing just enough detail to tell the story. I’m trying to get the shapes, angles right and perspective right. These were all drawn with pencils from a WHSmith sketching pencils set – nothing fancy. They all measure about 15 cm x 20 cm.

What I also need to do now is translate these pencil sketches into watercolour sketches…

Watercolour

Sailing

Sailing - NB

At the weekend I spent some time watching all the different sailng boats coming and going in the bay. I took some photographs and then sat outside to do some watercolour sketches of a few of them.

The photos I took were backlit so the boats were silhouetted. Therefore I painted them with just black watercolour paint – Lamp Black to be exact. The purpose of this exercise was for me to practice getting the shapes of the boats right – not with too much detail, but just enough to identify each sailing boat. I did start off with some very light pencil sketches first.

I enjoyed painting these and it was some much needed sketching practice for me…

#WorldWatercolorMonth

Watercolour

The Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains - NB
The Blue Mountains

This watercolour sketch is an exercise in layering colour painted on khadi paper and inspired by Hazel Soan’s book The Essence Of Watercolour. When layering watercolours you have to let one layer dry completely before adding the next (unless you’re going for a wet in wet effect). This takes PATIENCE… ! I’ve found that patience is one of the hardest things to learn with watercolour painting – just letting certain areas of a painting dry completely without touching or fiddling. Hazel Soan is so right when she says in her book (link above) that much of a watercolourist’s life is spent watching paint dry… !

My landscape above is monochromatic but the colour was mixed in the palette first. The colours I mixed together for my landscape were: Prussian Blue, Indigo and Cadmium Yellow Medium Hue – all by Daniel Smith.  I’m going to practice layering much more and start experimenting with different colours to develop an idea of how they work together…

#WorldWatercolorMonth

Watercolour

Watercolour Rose Macro

Watercolour Macro Rose - NB
Watercolour Rose Macro

A rose macro painted loosely in watercolour. It was painted on Arches paper. The colours I chose to use were Naples Yellow, Quinacridone Rose and Rhodonite Genuine ~ all by Daniel Smith. This painting is my interpretation of one of my own photos shown below…

Macro Rose

Painting an exact copy of the photo is not what I wanted to do – Hazel Soan’s words ring in my ears “you are using the subject matter to create a watercolour, not using watercolour to recreate the subject”. Just capturing the essence of what’s in the photo or my own interpretation is enough. At the end of the day, for me it’s all about getting lots of practice at painting with watercolours and this was very good practice for me…

#WorldWatercolorMonth

Watercolour

Little Blue Hyrdrangea Flower

Little Blue Hydrangea Flower
Little Blue Hyrdrangea Flower ~ watercolour

A watercolour sketch of a little blue hydrangea flower. This sketch is my interpretation of one of my own photos which you can see below. This turned out not quite as loose as I originally intended it to be but I like it all the same. No pencil sketch for this – I just used my paintbrush to paint the general shape of the little flower and then gradually worked on some details. It’s worth clicking on the sketch to view it larger…

This is my original photo:

Ocean Blue - DIB

I think I will regard this as a practice sketch and have another go at this – try for a looser version and alter the colours a little, it’s all good practice…

WorldWatercolorMonth

Watercolour

Daniel Smith Watercolour Pairs

DS Colour Combinations - NB
Daniel Smith Watercolour Pairs

I indulged in a little colour play very early this morning before it got too hot. Here are 14 pairs of colours I’ve put together on a page in my khadi paper sketchbook. The colours I’ve used are:

Left Column:    (from the top)

Indigo + Permanent Orange, Cerulean Blue Chromium + Naples Yellow, Prussian Blue + Ultramarine Turquoise, Permanent Orange + Phthalo Blue Green Shade (GS), French Ultramarine + Yellow Ochre, Rhodonite Genuine + Cadmium Yellow Medium & Quinacridone Coral + Quinacridone Gold

Right Column     (from the top)

Paynes Blue Gray + Raw Sienna Light, Phthalo Blue GS + Cobalt Teal Blue, Carbazole Violet + Indigo, Buff Titanium + Potters Pink, Cobalt Teal Blue + Buff Titanium, Quinacridone Gold + Ultramarine Turquoise & Viridian + Phthalo Blue GS

All paints used were by Daniel Smith…

The colours in each pair look lovely together. And as far as colour combinations go, I’ve barely scratched the surface. I haven’t consulted a colour wheel for this exercise and there are no rules. I’ve simply used my own judgement as to what colours I feel look good together in pairs. Many of the colour pairs I tried out first on a piece of scrap paper before painting them in my sketchbook.

I love all these pairs of colours but I do have some favourites… ! For example I especially love the Cerulean Blue Chromium + Naples yellow together. Another favourite is the Permanent Orange + Phthalo Blue GS. Also  favourites are the Quinacridone Gold + Ultramarine Turquoise and Quinacridone Coral + Quinacridone Gold….

This is such a fun way for me to expand my knowledge of colours, pigments and and how they react with each other on paper. And it’s also a wonderful way to work out which colours I personally like or don’t like together. I will do some more colour charts like this with different colour pairs – I have lots of colours I haven’t tried yet…

It is worth clicking on the image to view it larger.  You can also take this exercise a step further and put different sets of pairs together to make a foursome; for example why not put the ‘Permanent Orange +Phthalo Blue GS’ pair with the ‘Buff Titanium + Cobalt Teal Blue’ pair – that would make a lovely foursome. Or I could put the ‘Carbazole Violet + Indigo’ pair with the ‘Prussian Blue + Ultramarine Turquoise’ pair – that would be a gorgeous foursome. You get the idea…

Building up a collection of colour charts like this is a lovely way of seeing at a glance which colours could work for you and which do not. So why not get all your colours out and start pairing them up on a large sheet of paper – you may get some lovely colourful surprises…

WorldWatercolorMonth

Watercolour

Vintage Bottle

Vintage Bottle - NB
Vintage Bottle

A vintage bottle from my kitchen window sill painted with watercolours. The bottle is quite old and the glass is a lovely turquoise/green colour when the light shines through it. Having been inspired by Jean Haines new book Atmospheric Flowers In Watercolour, I started looking for different vases, glasses etc. that I could put flowers in to paint. Then I remembered my little vintage bottle collection – they would be perfect to put flowers in! This is a practice watercolour sketch done in my khadi paper sketchbook. I thought I’d better practice getting the shape of the bottle right first before starting a proper painting…

From my sketch you can see that the top of the bottle has been broken in the past and the glass is rough and uneven. The bottom and sides of the bottle are thick and domed. The colours I chose to capture my vintage bottle were Cobalt Teal Blue, Cobalt Turquoise and Viridian. Now I just need a nice rose to go in it and I will have a lovely floral still life to capture in watercolour…

#WorldWatercolorMonth