Photography

Wells’ Textures

I have just returned from a lovely weeks holiday with family in Wells-Next-The-Sea, North Norfolk. This is a part of Britain’s coast we’ve never been to before. The main purpose for coming here for a holiday was so that Carolyn and I could attend a two day art workshop hosted by artist Debbie Lyddon in her Whelk Shed Studio.  There will be more about the art workshop in a separate post.

Wells is a small town and quite old fashioned, which I love. Wells has a quay in the town with lots of boats. There are lovely seaside smells of sea salt and crabs as you walk along the quay. The quay divides into lots of different channels separated by the marshes. It’s a very interesting landscape.

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The Quay at Wells-Next-The-Sea

Wells does have a “proper” beach about a 10 minute walk from the quay but to be honest, from an artist’s point of view, the quay is a lot more interesting. Carolyn and I had a walk along the quay a few days after the art workshop had finished. Here are some of the lovely textures and colours that can be found along the quay….

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Soft neutral colours and lovely texture from the rope and textiles…

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A whelk shed window

Lovely textures and patterns in the windows of an unused whelk shed…

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A whelk shed window

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ropes in varying shades of blue…

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Soft grey colours and patterns in the mud
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Oyster Shell in black and white

Oyster shells can be found along the pebbly shores of the quay…

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Inside an Oyster Shell
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Rust and canvas

There’s an abundance of rust to be found in Wells – a by product of the salty sea air…

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Rich ochre and sienna colours in the rust
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Ropes and rust
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Peeling paint in shades of soft green and blue

The soft paler green in the above image Carolyn and I have named “Wells Green” – you see a lot of it here…

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Notice the aubergine/purple tones in the rust – they’re just beautiful…

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Beautiful vintage blues and yellows

Wells-Next-The-Sea is texture heaven. Colour and texture is everywhere throughout the town. My next task will be to use these awesome colours and textures to inspire some abstract watercolour sketches and paintings…

Drawing & Sketching

Doors and Windows

I’ve spent a little time sketching some doors and windows today. Any time spent drawing/sketching is time well spent, whatever the outcome. Architecture interests me – I like doors, windows, old buildings, Mediterranean style buildings and unusual shaped architectural features. Here’s today’s sketching efforts…

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A Mediterranean Door

My first sketching effort, above, is a Mediterranean door. I liked the little narrow window and the old  cracked stonework underneath. The heavy wooden door was set into the wall with a couple of very worn steps leading up to it. It’s a building that has character. I deliberately didn’t sketch every last detail – I just concentrated on drawing just enough to tell the story…

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A Mediterranean Window

The Mediterranean window above caught my eye. I liked how the shutters were just slightly open and I liked the nearby lamp on the wall. Drawing the angle of the shutters correctly was a bit tricky. I have to keep telling myself “just draw what you see” and not what you think you see…

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A Quirky Cornish Door

I liked the unusual shape of this Cornish door – the sloping angle of the lintel and door. It  was very quirky and had lots of character…

I like drawing. As I’ve already said, drawing every last detail isn’t important to me – I just want to concentrate on drawing just enough detail to tell the story. I’m trying to get the shapes, angles right and perspective right. These were all drawn with pencils from a WHSmith sketching pencils set – nothing fancy. They all measure about 15 cm x 20 cm.

What I also need to do now is translate these pencil sketches into watercolour sketches…